How to make an Art

     I saw a video one time on YouTube about “how to make an Art”. It sticks in my head, because even though its irreverent and coarse he speaks with understanding. He uses the term “an Art” to give his video a humorous tone, as well as a creative spin. His style of talking carries on this humour: “where do you find scratch in 2011?” he asks. What makes art “an art” that people recognise as such is one of the questions of our generation.

     We are so fascinated with the enormous values that “an art” can demand at auction. We’re confounded by the mystique of “an art” and the fact that in this hyper-digital world, there is still a place for the artist. Every time I hear about a large art sale, or a new Damien Hirst piece, I hear echoes of “I could do that” passed from person to person, everybody nods in unison. Graduate student Naroa Lizar Redrado probably has heard that phrase passed around a number of times in her studies at the University for the Creative Arts in Kent.

     Last summer, she presented a graduating thesis project that consisted of DIY Art Kits. Each kit gives the buyer the ability to recreate a well known and recognisable work of art themselves. Now everyone can follow up on their claims of “I could do that”. Unfortunately, these kits are not for sale, and are a comment on the viewer’s confusion about “an art”. These kits pull away the veil, and give everyone an artist’s perspective of “an art” before it becomes “an art”. That is what I see, anyhow – your mileage may vary.

     The following images and words via Flavorwire.com

1. Recreate Damien Hirst’s Love of God for £49.99. Kit includes a plastic human-size skull, 8,601 crystal beads, glue, paintbrush, tweezers, and silver paint.

2. Recreate Rachel Whiteread’s Pink Torso for £5. Kit includes a hot water bottle (2 liter) and alginate.

3. Recreate Marc Quinn’s Self (1991) for £20. Kit includes VC blood bag, alginate, plaster bandages, cotton, face cream, disposable gloves, silicon swimming hat, and a band-aid.

4. Recreate Tracy Emin’s Everyone I have Ever slept with 1963-1995 for £16. Kit includes camping tent for 2 people, sewing kit, colorful threads, and assorted fabrics.

5. Recreate Banksy’s graffiti for £10. Kit includes spray paint and stencils.

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~ by Edzerza on November 15, 2011.

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